Monday, November 25, 2013

Samsung Galaxy S5: Aluminium body, 16 megapixel camera and a curved screen?

The video alleges that the Galaxy S5 will not only have a curved display, but also one that flexes
and bends by about 30 degrees.
A video on YouTube has predicted what the features and specs of the next flagship Samsung device, 
the Galaxy S5 would look like.According to the video, the next premium device will have a curved 
screen, aluminium body and a 16 megapixel camera with 4K (which is four times the quality of Full HD).
The video alleges that the Galaxy S5 will not only have a curved display, but also one that flexes and
 bends by about 30 degrees.
The video also states that the phone runs on the latest version of Android, Kit Kat 4.4, and features 
a 64-bit octo-core processor. The phone has 2K HD screen with Super Amoled 2560 x 1440 for 
better display. The phone also has 3GB RAM.The phone is also rumoured to have a mammoth 
4000 mAH battery for better performance.The video, made by O2 Guru TV, also suggests that the 
Galaxy S5 is only a few months away from its release.
These predictions sure look very drool-worthy. If Samsung is listening, its thumbs-up all the way!

Saturday, November 16, 2013

Satellite

File:NASA Earth-observing Fleet June 2012.ogv 
NASA's Earth-observing fleet as of June 2012.
An animation depicting the orbits of GPS satellites in medium Earth orbit.
A full-size model of the Earth observation satellite ERS 2
In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit. Such objects are sometimes called artificial satellites to distinguish them from natural satellites such as the Moon.
The world's first artificial satellite, the Sputnik 1, was launched by the Soviet Union in 1957. Since then, thousands of satellites have been launched into orbit around the Earth. Some satellites, notably space stations, have been launched in parts and assembled in orbit. Artificial satellites originate from more than 50 countries and have used the satellite launching capabilities of ten nations. A few hundred satellites are currently operational, whereas thousands of unused satellites and satellite fragments orbit the Earth as space debris. A few space probes have been placed into orbit around other bodies and become artificial satellites to the Moon, MercuryVenusMarsJupiterSaturnVestaEros, and the Sun.
Satellites are used for a large number of purposes. Common types include military and civilian Earth observation satellites,communications satellitesnavigation satellites, weather satellites, and research satellites. Space stations and human spacecraftin orbit are also satellites. Satellite orbits vary greatly, depending on the purpose of the satellite, and are classified in a number of ways. Well-known (overlapping) classes include low Earth orbitpolar orbit, and geostationary orbit.
About 6,600 satellites have been launched. The latest estimates are that 3,600 remain in orbit.[1] Of those, about 1000 are operational;[2][3]the rest have lived out their useful lives and are part of the space debris. Approximately 500 operational satellites are in low-Earth orbit, 50 are in medium-Earth orbit (at 20,000 km), the rest are in geostationary orbit (at 36,000 km).[4]
Satellites are usually semi-independent computer-controlled systems. Satellite subsystems attend many tasks, such as power generation, thermal control, telemetry, attitude control and orbit control.

Monday, November 4, 2013

SkyBlue Blogger Templates




Features:
Instructions:Template Settings / How to install a Blogger template
Template author:Djogzs
Description:
SkyBlue is a free blogger template with 1 column,responsive design, gallery-styled, fresh look, rounded corners, exclusive design for Blogger, footer columns, social bookmarking icons, posts thumbnails, drop down menu, breadcrumbs and well formatted threaded comments.
Excellent layout for blogs about any general topic, crafts, girls, movies or photography.



Saturday, November 2, 2013

Women's skin ages faster than men's

Women's skin ages faster than men's, says a study using a new laser-based technique to measure damage from sun exposure and aging.
TORONTO: Women's skin ages faster than men's, says a German study using a new laser-based technique to measure damage from sun exposure and aging.
The study, published in Optics Letters, a journal of the Optical Society of America, was based on a new technique in which doctors shine pulses of
infrared laser light to look at deeper layers of the skin andmeasure aging. The imaging of collagen and elastin, whose degeneration causes wrinkles and loss of smoothness, found that women lose collagen faster than men.
"The dependence appeared to be sex-dependent, with women's skin losing collagen at faster rates than men's," said researchers from Germany's Freidrich Schiller University and the Fraunhofer Institute of Biomedical Technology.
Collagens are a group of proteins in the dermis, the connective tissue layer of the skin, and are responsible for the strength of skin. The human body makes a lot of collagen in youth but production declines with age.
Currently, dermatologists who want to examine a patient's collagen network in the dermis have to remove a sample of tissue and look at it under a microscope.
Authors of the study said this new non-invasive test might one day help test anti-aging products and the study of skin diseases that affect collagen structure.

Viagra may aggravate severe apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the soft tissues at the back of the throat collapse and close off the airway during sleep.
NEW YORK: Viagra (sildenafil) taken at bedtime may worsen breathing problems in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, results of a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine suggest.
Obstructive sleep apnea is a common problem that occurs when the soft tissues at the back of the throat collapse and close off the airway during sleep, resulting in brief moments in which breathing stops. Impotence, also known as erectile dysfunction, is highly prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, note Dr Suely Roizenblatt, of Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and colleagues.
However, sildenafil prolongs the action of nitric oxide, which promotes upper airway congestion. The researchers therefore examined the effects of a single 50-mg dose of sildenafil on the sleep of 14 men (average age, 53.1 years) with severe obstructive sleep apnea.
Compared with placebo, sildenafil led to a significantly increased desaturation index, the number of episodes of oxygen reduction per hour of recording time. There was also a significant increase in the percentage of total sleep time with an oxygen saturation of less than 90 per cent and a significant increase in the maximal duration of a desaturation event.
Sleep structure was also altered by sildenafil use, with in increase in stage 2 non-rapid eye movement sleep compared with placebo and a decrease in deep sleep compared with the start of the study and placebo, Dr Roizenblatt's team reports.

Cure with progesterone: Female hormone may treat brain injuries

Studies say that giving progesterone soon after injury reduces brain swelling, prevents nerve death and improves functional outcomes.
NEW YORK: Treatment with progesterone, a well-known hormone that prepares the womb for pregnancy, safely reduces the risk of death and disability in people who suffer a traumatic brain injury, new research suggests.  
Animal studies have indicated that giving progesterone soon after injury reduces brain swelling, prevents nerve death and improves functional outcomes.
Lead researcher Dr David W Wright and colleagues note that progesterone's advantages over other potential treatments include its ability to quickly enter the brain, history of safe use, ease of administration, and low cost.  
Wright, from Emory University in Atlanta, and colleagues included in their study 100 adults with brain injury who reached the emergency department within 11 hours of injury. Patients were randomly assigned to receive an intravenous dose of progesterone or inactive "placebo".  
The death rate in the 30 days after injury was 13 per cent in the progesterone group compared with 30 per cent in the comparison group. This suggests that progesterone cut the risk of death by 57 per cent.  
Aside from some minor inflammation at the progesterone injection site, the side effects seen with the hormone were comparable to those observed with placebo. No serious side effects were seen in either group.  
Wright's team was able to contact 92 per cent of patients who survived 30 days. There was evidence that progesterone improved the recovery of patients with moderate brain injury. Patients with severe injury seemed to glean no benefit from the hormone.    
One-year outcomes will be reported later, the authors note. Still, the findings are encouraging and indicate the need for additional studies to investigate this topic further.

Low birth weight babies could face cognitive problems: Study

Low birth weight babies could face more physical, mental and cognitive difficulties as compared to those with normal weight, says a new study.
NEW YORK: Low birth weight babies could face more physical, mental and cognitive difficulties as compared to those with normal weight, says a new study.
Low birth weight has been known to increase the risk of disabilities like cerebral palsy and mental retardation.
However, new research suggests that low birth weight may also contribute to minor difficulties in motor skills and cognitive abilities like thinking, learning and memory, reported the Newswise wire quoting a study published in the October issue of Archives of Paediatrics & Adolescent Medicine journal.
The study also said these problems could last till adolescence but added that enhanced maternal-foetal and neonatal care may help them improve.
Agnes H. Whitaker and colleagues at Columbia University Medical Center and New York State Psychiatric Institute studied 474 non-disabled adolescents who were born at or admitted to one of three New Jersey hospitals between 1984 and 1987 and weighed less than 2,000 grams at birth.
The participants, who had an average age of 16 at the time of assessment for the study, underwent intelligence and motor tests at their homes.
Compared with the standardisation sample, or the large group of teens used to provide a reference point for the assessments, the adolescents with low birth weight had more motor problems.
Their IQ scores were within the normal range, but on an average were significantly lower than the average for their age group.
Male participants, who had injuries to the white matter (nerve tissue) of the brain on neonatal ultrasound and who spent more days on a ventilator as infants, were more likely to have motor difficulties, the researchers said.
Social disadvantages, a lower foetal growth ratio (calculated by dividing birth weight by the median weight for the infant's age) and white matter injury, also predicted lower IQ scores.
But the researchers also noted that enhanced maternal-foetal and neonatal care have the potential to substantially improve cognitive and motor outcomes for non-disabled low birth weight children.

Many men in relationships also pay for sex: Study

Many men who pay for sex are already in relationships, the findings of a small UK study show.
NEW YORK: Many men who pay for sex are already in relationships, the findings of a small UK study show.
The study "raises awareness of the risks taken by men who pay for sex, and the risks they are also placing on their partners," co-author Dr. Tamsin Groom, a specialist registrar in sexual and reproductive health at The Sandyford Initiative in Glasgow, Scotland, told Reuters Health.
"Routine questions about commercial sexual contacts could allow targeted health promotion and harm minimisation for this group of men, protecting their partners - both unsuspecting and commercial," Groom and co-author R. Nandwani write in the journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases.
Previously published results from the second national survey of sexual attitudes and lifestyles showed that the number of men in the general UK population who reported paying for sex increased to 4.2 percent in 2000, from 2.0 percent in 1990.
A separate analysis of the data revealed that men who paid for sex were more likely than their counterparts to report having at least 10 sex partners during the previous five years, and only 15 percent of these men said they had ever been tested for HIV.
Groom and Nandwani analysed questionnaire responses from 2,665 men who visited the Sandyford clinic for genitourinary medicine and reproductive health services between October 2002 and February 2004.
Ten percent (267) of the men said they had ever paid for sex or been paid for sex. In cases that could be assessed, 43 percent of those who paid for sex seemed to have done so while in a relationship, Groom and Nandwani report.
Almost one third (32 percent) of men paid for sex more than once while they were in a relationship. Still, these men''s relationships lasted about 11 years, on average, the report indicates.
Those who paid for sex abroad (51 percent) were almost twice as likely to engage in unprotected vaginal sex than those who paid for sex locally or in other areas of the UK.
Many of the men tested positive for a sexually transmitted infection, which "shows the possibility of STI transmission, and for men paying for sex abroad, the possibility of acting as a "bridge" between different populations," the authors write.
None of the 120 men tested for HIV were infected, although one man had hepatitis C infection, the authors note.
Two thirds of the men said they had paid for sex at some point during the previous year and 35 percent said they had done so within the previous month. Those who had paid for sex during the previous year reported an average of five different sex partners.
Despite these findings, Groom told Reuters Health that people should not panic. "Not all men are paying for sex and (most) are doing it safely, if at all," the researcher noted.
On the other hand, Groom adds, "if you are someone who is paying for sex please discuss it with your local sexual health service, (which can and) should be able to provide nonjudgmental advice and discuss ways to make yourself safer."

Hours before a heart attack can be telling

A recent study by the University of Berlin said that people are often forewarned, sometimes several hours before, about a heart attack.
A recent study by the University of Berlin said that people are often forewarned, sometimes several hours before, about a heart attack. The study suggests that recognising some of the symptoms � persistent chest pain, unexplained breathlessness, dizziness, sweating and vomiting � which might be the body's way of giving you a warning is the first step towards treatment.
Sudden cardiac arrest : Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops pumping blood abruptly. This happens when non-critical blockages in the heart arteries rupture resulting in clot formation and abrupt cessation of blood flow.
"Blocks in arteries are normal in the ageing process and starts from the age of 20. When these blocks burst open, they expose the underlying fatty tissues. This causes clotting, resulting in a sudden cardiac arrest. This can occur any time and recognising the symptoms is difficult but crucial," says Dr Sudhir Vaishnav, interventional cardiologist, Asian Hearth Institute Research Centre, Mumbai. "Typically, the symptoms show up 20 minutes to a few hours before the attack."
Chest discomfort
Patients experience chest discomfort or pain in the centre of the chest or all across the chest. This feels like there's pressure or squeezing as if there's a weight on the chest. The patient will not be to pinpoint the source of the pain; it is a diffused discomfort or pain and lasts for at least 20 minutes.
This pain is usually confused with muscular or gastric-related pain but the biggest differentiator is that while muscular or gastric pain fluctuates, this kind of chest pain is constant. Further, if a patient exerts himself, the symptom is aggravated.
Radiating pain: Sometimes the pain, rather than occurring in the chest, can occur in the left arm, right arm, neck, jaws, stomach or tooth. Patients with hyper-acidity may experience a burning sensation in the chest. The symptoms may get aggravated with exertion.
Says Dr Vaishnav, "If there is no logical explanation for the pain, such as acidity due to eating certain food or consumption of antibiotics, you can assume that there is a heart problem."
Breathlessness, dizziness: Breathless and dizziness could be symptoms of a cardiac arrest but distinguishing them can be difficult. For these too, there should be a logical explanation, such as exertion, behind the symptoms. "All these symptoms will be accompanied by other symptoms such pain during walking, discomfort in the chest after meals and slight chest discomfort," says Dr Vaishnav.
Vomiting, sweating: Diabetics or elderly women must be alert to unexplained vomiting, sweating or giddiness. "In fact, women have more malignant type of heart problems and the fatality rate is higher. They are usually protected until menopause, due to certain hormones, but afterward they are as much at risk as men," says Dr Vaishnav.
What do you do?: If you suspect you are having a heart attack, don't wait for the doctor, just go to the closest ICCU and get an ECG done.
However, before medical help arrives, patients can take an aspirin tablet with a little water or keep a sorbitrate tablet below the tongue. Bystanders or family members can also administer cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). "Most people refuse to acknowledge or recognise the symptoms because they believe that they are fit. It can occur anytime to anybody," says Dr Vaishnav.

Do vaccines harm or arm our babies?

As the number of vaccines being prescribed for infants grows, so do the doubts surrounding them, writes Labonita Ghosh.
A few days after Reggie Mathew's daughter was born, the proud parents took their little one for the first of her prescribed inoculations. Besides the routine vaccines, Mathew's paediatrician also recommended a new combination vaccine.
At Rs4,500 a dose, it would, the doctor said, protect the baby from pneumonia, meningitis and ear infections. Though Mathew (not his real name) wants the best for his little girl, he refused the new vaccine.
"It wasn't about the money," says the 40-year-old media professional. "The vaccine is new, so I don't know about its possible side and after effects. I don't want to discover, a few years later, that it has led to complications."
Let's face it � when it comes to the health of children, there can be no compromise. No limit to the amount of protection parents can, and would like to, provide. "I can't keep my child locked away from dirt and other children, or make sure she travels only in air-conditioned cars and never plays in the park," says dentist Rashmi Swali.
"But I feel more at ease knowing that, thanks to inoculation, she has a lesser chance of falling ill." Dr Nitin Shah, president of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) says, "Vaccination is the best investment parents can make for their children. Our country's vaccination history has, on the whole, been a safe one, no matter what some people say."
But, like Mathew, there is a growing band of parents who are trying to find out more about infant immunisation and, literally, reduce the needle pricks their child has to suffer.
There are several groups abroad, like Parents Against Vaccination, which detail horror stories about inoculations gone wrong, like a British study that found the basic measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to cause autism.
Parents should know this. By the time your child is five years old, he or she will have received between 13 and 20 vaccines, says Dr Shah, usually in combinations: a three-in-one for diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus (DPT), an "easy five", which clubs the three-in-one with immunisation for hepatitis B and haemophilus influenza and more. So are we over-vaccinating our children?
Doctors are divided about this. "We certainly are," says Dr DK Taneja of the Department of Community Medicine at Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi. "By reintroducing so many immunogens into a child's body, we are not allowing his or her natural immune system to develop."
Vaccines, made up of dead and live viruses and some chemical preservatives, inhibit the body's natural and long-term ability to fight microbes. It can, thus, do exactly the opposite of what is intended. It can harm rather than arm.
According to Dr Parang Mehta, who runs a childcare institute in Surat, many vaccines are not essential, but people still opt for them, like the varicella vaccine for chicken pox and the hepatitis A shot. Vaccines for influenza and meningitis, on the other hand, are recommended only during epidemics.
"But parents will inoculate their child against chicken pox just so he or she doesn't miss school or have ugly marks on his or her face," says Dr Mehta. IAP, in its vaccination schedule, has now put some of these shots under its "additional" rather than "optional" category.
With cheaper Chinese and Korean-made vaccines available, parents need to be vigilant, adds Dr Mehta. In Delhi last month, IAP's infectious diseases chapter took up the matter of safeguards for new vaccines in the market.
But the panel could not come up with anything � private practitioners say only government agencies have the resources to test and OK new vaccines � apart from depending on the Food and Drugs Administration or Health Ministry clearances.
"We never push for additional vaccines," says Dr Prashant Moralwar, a Navi Mumbai paediatrician. "We tell parents about the pros and cons and leave the decision to them." That probably does not help a whole lot, given that few parents would want to gamble with their child's health.
"I'm not insisting on vaccines for hay fever and dengue for my five-year-old," adds Swali, "but I trust my doctor completely and never try to second-guess him."
One thing that could make Indian parents less needle-happy and dependent on doctors, is more information. And that, to both supporters and naysayers, would be more welcome.

Do vaccines harm or arm our babies?

As the number of vaccines being prescribed for infants grows, so do the doubts surrounding them, writes Labonita Ghosh.
A few days after Reggie Mathew's daughter was born, the proud parents took their little one for the first of her prescribed inoculations. Besides the routine vaccines, Mathew's paediatrician also recommended a new combination vaccine.
At Rs4,500 a dose, it would, the doctor said, protect the baby from pneumonia, meningitis and ear infections. Though Mathew (not his real name) wants the best for his little girl, he refused the new vaccine.
"It wasn't about the money," says the 40-year-old media professional. "The vaccine is new, so I don't know about its possible side and after effects. I don't want to discover, a few years later, that it has led to complications."
Let's face it � when it comes to the health of children, there can be no compromise. No limit to the amount of protection parents can, and would like to, provide. "I can't keep my child locked away from dirt and other children, or make sure she travels only in air-conditioned cars and never plays in the park," says dentist Rashmi Swali.
"But I feel more at ease knowing that, thanks to inoculation, she has a lesser chance of falling ill." Dr Nitin Shah, president of the Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) says, "Vaccination is the best investment parents can make for their children. Our country's vaccination history has, on the whole, been a safe one, no matter what some people say."
But, like Mathew, there is a growing band of parents who are trying to find out more about infant immunisation and, literally, reduce the needle pricks their child has to suffer.
There are several groups abroad, like Parents Against Vaccination, which detail horror stories about inoculations gone wrong, like a British study that found the basic measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to cause autism.
Parents should know this. By the time your child is five years old, he or she will have received between 13 and 20 vaccines, says Dr Shah, usually in combinations: a three-in-one for diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus (DPT), an "easy five", which clubs the three-in-one with immunisation for hepatitis B and haemophilus influenza and more. So are we over-vaccinating our children?
Doctors are divided about this. "We certainly are," says Dr DK Taneja of the Department of Community Medicine at Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi. "By reintroducing so many immunogens into a child's body, we are not allowing his or her natural immune system to develop."
Vaccines, made up of dead and live viruses and some chemical preservatives, inhibit the body's natural and long-term ability to fight microbes. It can, thus, do exactly the opposite of what is intended. It can harm rather than arm.
According to Dr Parang Mehta, who runs a childcare institute in Surat, many vaccines are not essential, but people still opt for them, like the varicella vaccine for chicken pox and the hepatitis A shot. Vaccines for influenza and meningitis, on the other hand, are recommended only during epidemics.
"But parents will inoculate their child against chicken pox just so he or she doesn't miss school or have ugly marks on his or her face," says Dr Mehta. IAP, in its vaccination schedule, has now put some of these shots under its "additional" rather than "optional" category.
With cheaper Chinese and Korean-made vaccines available, parents need to be vigilant, adds Dr Mehta. In Delhi last month, IAP's infectious diseases chapter took up the matter of safeguards for new vaccines in the market.
But the panel could not come up with anything � private practitioners say only government agencies have the resources to test and OK new vaccines � apart from depending on the Food and Drugs Administration or Health Ministry clearances.
"We never push for additional vaccines," says Dr Prashant Moralwar, a Navi Mumbai paediatrician. "We tell parents about the pros and cons and leave the decision to them." That probably does not help a whole lot, given that few parents would want to gamble with their child's health.
"I'm not insisting on vaccines for hay fever and dengue for my five-year-old," adds Swali, "but I trust my doctor completely and never try to second-guess him."
One thing that could make Indian parents less needle-happy and dependent on doctors, is more information. And that, to both supporters and naysayers, would be more welcome.

Restless Legs Syndrome May Cause Heart Problems: Study

TUESDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) — People with restless legs syndrome face twice the risk of a stroke or heart disease compared to people who don’t have the neurological condition, a new study suggests.
The risk is greatest in people with the most frequent and the most severe symptoms of restless legs syndrome.
“This shows that restless legs syndrome has salience beyond just symptoms,” said Dr. David Rye, a professor of neurology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. “It’s really saying, this disorder is salient, you need to recognize it.”
Other experts added a cautionary note to the study’s findings.
“This study is very well done, and the conclusions of the study are very measured. In other words, the authors acknowledge that they can’t prove that what they’re studying actually causes strokes or heart attacks,” said Dr. Paul Greene, associate attending physician in the department of neurology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. “They also could have picked up people with other syndromes, neuropathies and things that could influence strokes and heart attacks. There are a lot of ways in which this study could be misleading.
“They will have to do something to follow up on this before pushing a panic button,” he added.
Neither physician was involved with the study, which was conducted by researchers from Harvard and other institutions, and is published in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Neurology.
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder characterized by restlessness and a need to move the legs. Symptoms start or become worse when you are resting. The symptoms occur mainly at night and can interfere with sleep. Some 5 percent to 10 percent of the adult population suffers from the syndrome, according to the study.
Earlier studies showed an association between restless legs syndrome and cardiovascular disease, but the studies had limitations. RLS has also suffered from a public image problem, which may explain why so few studies have explored the condition.
“RLS has borne the brunt of a lot of skepticism,” Rye explained. “Snoring started out the same way… It took decades to convince primary-care physicians that we have to treat sleep apnea, that it’s not just a nuisance that dad snores. It [sleep apnea] has a huge added risk for obesity and stroke and hypertension and cardiovascular disease.”
The new study, the largest of its kind, looked at 3,433 men and women, with an average age of 68, who were enrolled in the Sleep Heart Health Study, which was originally designed to look at the cardiovascular consequences of sleep-disordered breathing.
A diagnosis of restless legs syndrome was based on a questionnaire completed by all study participants. The participants also answered questions about cardiovascular disease and stroke. Almost 7 percent of women and 3.3 percent of men in the study had restless legs syndrome.
People with the syndrome were more than twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease or stroke. The association was strongest among those who had RLS symptoms a minimum of 16 times a month and among those who said their symptoms were severe.
The study can’t prove a cause-and-effect relationship, but such a link could make physiological sense. Most people with restless legs syndrome have up to 300 periodic leg movements a night, and those movements are associated with increases in blood pressure and heart rate, the study authors said.
Also, people with RLS often also suffer from sleep deprivation, which has been associated with cardiovascular disease.
“The direct data would suggest that the disrupted sleep and arousals that occur with RLS are really what’s contributing to hypertension and heightened autonomic nervous system activity, which in turns leads to cardiovascular [problems],” Rye said. “But this [study] can’t answer that kind of question.”
The next study should look to see if treatments for restless legs syndrome reduce the risk for heart disease and stroke, Rye added. “Nobody has done that, because nobody has recognized that there was a problem,” he said.

Holiday Brunch: This Tropical Drink is Full of Fresh Fruit

This recipe for Four Flowers Mimosa will brighten any party with its tropical flavor.
Makes 12 servings
Prep: 12 minutes
Make the juice the night before, cover, and store in the fridge. Be sure to give it a stir before adding the sparkling wine.
Ingredients:
1 ripe pineapple
2 cups fresh orange juice, divided
4 ripe medium bananas
3 tablespoons maple syrup
2 tablespoons grenadine
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
6 cups sparkling white wine
Instructions:
1. Remove the skin from the pineapple. Cut it lengthwise into quarters. Cut off the thick core from each quarter. Slice 2 of the pineapple quarters lengthwise into long spears; wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve.
2. Chop the remaining pineapple quarters into chunks. In a food
processor, puree the pineapple with 1/2 cup of the orange juice. Pour into
a large pitcher.
3. Using the processor, puree the bananas with 1/2 cup of the orange juice. Stir into the pitcher. Add the remaining orange juice, maple syrup, grenadine, and lemon juice. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled.
4. In each of 12 tall glasses, pour 1/2 cup juice and 1/2 cup sparkling wine. Garnish each with a pineapple spear. (Serving size: 8 ounces)
Nutrition:
Calories 177 (1% from fat); Fat 0g (sat 0g, mono 0g, poly 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Protein 1g; Carbohydrate 26g; Sugars 17g; Fiber 2g; Iron 0mg; Sodium 3mg; Calcium 17mg

Holiday Brunch: Low-Fat Milk Lightens This Rich and Creamy Cocoa

This European-style Parisian Hot Chocolate recipe is so rich, you only need a little. The kids will go crazy for it.
Makes 8 servings
Prep: 5 minutes
Cook: 20 minutes
Ingredients:
1 quart 1% low-fat milk
6 ounces high quality bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
1/2 cup Dutch process cocoa
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup whipping cream
Whipped cream, for serving, optional
Grated bittersweet chocolate, for serving, optional
Instructions:
1. In top part of a double boiler, mix milk, chocolate, cocoa, and sugar. Place over simmering water and cook, stirring occasionally with a whisk, until chocolate has melted and mixture is smooth and hot, about 20 minutes. (Don’t have a double boiler? Heat chocolate mixture in a small saucepan over a larger pan of boiling water.) Stir in cream and heat through.
2. Pour into mugs, top with whipped cream and the chocolate shavings, if desired, and serve while warm. (Serving size: about 3/4 cup)
Variation: Make Mocha Chocolate à la Paris by substituting hot, strong-brewed coffee for whipping cream.
Nutrition:
Calories 244 (44% from fat); Fat 14g (sat 7g, mono 1g, poly 0g); Cholesterol 16mg; Protein 7g; Carbohydrate 32g; Sugars 26g; Fiber 3g; Iron 1mg; Sodium 58mg; Calcium 157mg

Holiday Brunch: Low-Cal Citrus Treat

This recipe for Morning Sundials can be prepped the night before. Just cut the grapefruit sections into one bowl and the orange sections into another. Cover both with plastic wrap, and store in the refrigerator overnight.
Prep: 10 minutes
Makes 8 servings
Ingredients:
5 pink grapefruit
5 oranges
1 (17.6-ounce) carton plain, fat-free
Greek-style yogurt
1/4 cup low-fat granola
Instructions:
1. Using a sharp knife, completely remove the outer skin and white pith of the grapefruit. Hold the grapefruit over a bowl, and cut out the sections, letting them fall into the bowl. Cut the orange sections into a separate bowl.
2. On each of 8 (8-inch) dessert plates, arrange 6 grapefruit sections and 6 orange sections in an alternating pattern around plate.
3. Spoon 1/4 cup yogurt onto the center of each grapefruit-orange arrangement, and sprinkle each with 1/2 tablespoon granola. Serve.
Nutrition:
Calories 130 (2.9% from fat); Fat 0g (sat 0g, mono 0g, poly 0g); Cholesterol 1mg; Protein 6g; Carbohydrate 30g; Sugars 12g; Fiber 4g; Iron 0mg; Sodium 46mg; Calcium 145mg

Holiday Brunch: Sarabeth Levine's Low-Cal Pancakes

Follow this easy recipe to make Sarabeth’s Pancakes. A breakfast-and brunch-favorite, they’re delicious with Sarabeth’s preserves.
Makes 8 servings (about 16 pancakes)
Prep: 5 minutes
Cook: 16 minutes
Toss in some cooked wheat berries (whole-wheat kernels that you’ll find in natural-foods stores) for a subtle chewiness. Blueberries are a delicous addition, too.
Ingredients:
1 cup (5 ounces) whole-wheat flour
1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 1/2 cups 1% low-fat milk
2 large eggs, separated
1 1/2 teaspoons butter, divided
Maple syrup, warmed, for serving
Sarabeth’s preserves, for serving
Instructions:
1. Put first 5 ingredients (through salt) in a large bowl and stir with a whisk; make a well in the center. Put egg yolks and milk in a medium bowl and stir with a whisk until blended. Pour the milk mixture into the well of the dry ingredients. Using a wood-en spoon, stir just until the batter is mixed. Do not overmix (a few tiny lumps of flour may remain).
2. In a small bowl, beat the egg whites with a hand mixer just until soft peaks form. Gently fold the egg whites into the batter.
3. Preheat a large nonstick pan. Add 1 teaspoon of the butter and heat over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium. Using 1/3 cup for each pancake, pour the batter into the pan, leaving 1 inch between pancakes. Cook until tiny bubbles form on the surface of the batter, about 2 minutes. Turn the pancakes and cook until the other side is golden brown, about 2 more minutes. Keep warm.
4. Add the remaining butter to the pan, and continue cooking until you run out of batter. Serve pancakes immediately on warmed plates, with the syrup and preserves on the side. (Serving size: 2 pancakes)
Nutrition:
Calories 219 (20% from fat); Fat 5g (sat 2g, mono 1g, poly 1g); Cholesterol 62mg; Protein 9g; Carbohydrate 18g; Sugars 7g; Fiber 3g; Iron 2mg; Sodium 270mg; Calcium 191mg
Recipes adapted from Sarabeth Levine

Recipe of the Day: Tartine with Blackberry Thyme Salad

For a simple, no-cook breakfast that’s also good for you, try this Tartine with Blackberry Thyme Salad recipe.
It only takes five minutes to whip up this power snack, which will help you burn fat and maintain a balanced diet. The bread and the yogurt will keep you feeling full for longer, and the blackberries are low in calories and fat. (And good for your heart, too!)
Load up your plate with this fruit, since it’s a superfood that’s high in antioxidants, vitamin C and fiber.
If you can’t find fresh blackberries, no worries! You can use frozen berries or other superfruits like blueberries or raspberries.
Ingredients: Blackberries, fresh thyme leaves, sugar, lemon juice, kosher salt, sourdough baguette, butter, low-fat yogurt

When Only One Partner Slims Down, Romance Can Sour

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FRIDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) A romantic relationship can change when one partner slims down, and not always in a good way, new research suggests.
“Losing weight can affect your relationship negatively,” said Lynsey Romo, an assistant professor of communication at North Carolina State University, in Raleigh.
In her study of 21 couples in which one partner had lost an average of 60 pounds in two years or less, she found the relationships usually changed for the better. That may have been due to the partner who lost weight inspiring the other to do the same, or to the partner supporting the one who lost the weight.
However, Romo also found what she calls ”the dark side of weight loss.” Some partners watched their partner getting slimmer and felt threatened or jealous, she explained.
Others, including some who didn’t need to lose weight, weren’t happy that they felt they were somehow losing their ”role” of the healthy partner. Other partners felt nagged by their suddenly healthy partner who was losing and wanted them to follow suit.
The study was published online recently in the journal Health Communication.
The couples, with an average age of 38 but ranging in age from 20 to 61, answered questions separately online after the partner had lost the weight. Participants lost in a number of ways, including diet and exercise or bariatric surgery.
Both partners told how they felt the weight loss affected their interactions. The best scenario Romo found was one in which both partners bought into the idea of making healthy lifestyle changes and supported the other partner trying to lose weight. Those couples appeared to get closer, she found.
They reported their interactions were more positive and they felt closer, both physically and emotionally.
However, when a partner who didn’t lose weight was not supportive or resisted the household changes in diet or exercise routines, the effect was negative.
While the partners who were losing weight were often cited by the other as a role model, sometimes they became naggers. One woman who lose 30 pounds and became very fit said she would sometimes nag her husband, who had gained weight over the years, to do the same. She felt he wasn’t trying as hard as she was to stay attractive for each other.
The new findings tie in to some research done by Charlotte Markey, an associate professor and chair of psychology at Rutgers University, who reviewed the findings.
In a relationship, she has found, ”partners compare their own bodies to their partner’s.” So it makes sense that Romo found when one partner lost weight, the other partner often took stock, so to speak.
Suppose a man loses weight, and his wife may need to but isn’t, Markey said. “That may make the woman feel inadequate,” she explained.
“We fall into these patterns with people we have relationships with,” she said. “When these patterns shift, it can be unsettling.”
Advice for couples in which one partner is about to lose weight? “It’s important to talk to your partner ahead of time,” Romo said. The goal is to get the other person on board — if not to lose weight, to support the partner who is trying to do so, she said.
Markey agreed that communication is key. “Talk about it before and keep talking about it,” she said. For example, if a husband is losing weight while the wife also needs to but isn’t, and the woman feels inadequate, she should simply tell him so, Markey said. “Hopefully the partner will say ‘Well, you shouldn’t.”’
“Make it a team effort,” Markey said. “Almost everyone can afford to eat healthier and exercise more.”

Hate Daylight Savings Time? Don’t Let Dark Days Get You Down

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Daylight Savings Time ends this Sunday, so remember to set your clocks back one hour. You’ll gain an hour of sleep, get more light in the morning, and lose light at the end of the day.
Some may look at it as a “glass half empty” situation–too dark to work out, play with your kids, or do other things outside at the end of the day–but we’re not going to let the dark hold us back, right?
That’s why we’ve come up with some simple tips to stick to your workout routine, stay happy this winter, (and save yoursanity) after Daylight Savings Time ends:
  • Make your new routine a priority. There’s a rumor is that it takes 21 days (or 3 weeks) to form a new habit. While you might have a few groggy mornings after the time change–a bit like jet lag–you should become accustomed in no time—and get the well-rested sleep you need!
  • Exercise more, not less. If dark days get you down, exercise can help lift your mood. Experts recommend 30 minutes a day, three times a week to boost your mood on dark days.
  • Don’t be tempted to stay up later because of the extra hour. Even if you’re not tired, try to hit the hay at your regular hour.
  • Join a group. If you work out in the evening, your once bright running route might be a darkened pathway. Look into joining a group class like a running group or outdoor boot camp. Safety is always in numbers (especially when it’s dark) and you’ll be more motivated (and held accountable) to make your workout versus heading home to veg on the couch.
  • Make the most of daytime hours. Can you squeeze in a workout during your lunch break? If not, try taking a walk to get a little sunshine (hello, vitamin D!) and fresh air.
  • Know the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Although some studies suggest that as many as 20% of people in the U.S. might have a mild form of SAD, a type of depression triggered by short, cold days, other research suggests it’s not as common as once thought.  If the change of seasons also seems to bring difficulty concentrating, irritability, and other depression symptoms, it could be SAD. (Treatments, including light therapy, can help.)

Study Finds Links Between Psoriasis, Heart Failure

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FRIDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) — People with the skin disorder psoriasis might be at higher risk for heart failure and should be screened for heart disease, experts say.
Researchers looked at medical data on all adults in Denmark. They found that people with psoriasis are more prone to develop heart failure and that the risk of heart failure rises as psoriasis gets more severe.
“Our findings underline the importance of regular evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis,” said study lead author Dr. Usman Khalid. Chronic inflammation — a component of both heart failure and psoriasis — may be the link between the two, he added.
Psoriasis affects 125 million people worldwide. It is a lifelong disorder that causes red, scaly patches on the skin.
“Psoriasis should be considered a systemic inflammatory disease that affects the whole body, rather than an isolated skin lesion,” Khalid explained. “Clinicians should consider early screening and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis — such as obesity, smoking and a sedentary lifestyle — in order to reduce the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and death.”
Educating patients with psoriasis about the association between their skin condition and heart disease is key to encouraging them to adopt heart healthy behaviors, Khalid added.
The study was presented at a recent European Society of Cardiology meeting in Amsterdam. Findings presented at meetings typically are considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.
Although the research found an association between psoriasis and increased risk for heart failure, it did not necessarily prove a cause-and-effect relationship.